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Tuesday, 18 September 2018

Haunting voice of child singing 'It's Raining, it's Pouring' torments family at night... turns out to be broken alarm at nearby firm caused by SPIDERS

  • Alice Connington, 34, and her family were haunted by the voice of the child
  • The mother-of-two from Ipswich was left unable to sleep at night
  • Council investigators tracked down the unnerving sound to a nearby estate
  • The spooky sound was set off by spiders crawling over motion sensors
The eerie voice of a child singing 'It's Raining, it's Pouring' that tormented a family for months was caused by an alarm used to deter trespassers- that had been set off by spiders.
Alice Connington, 34, who lives in Ipswich with her two young children, was left haunted by the sinister tune and unable to sleep.
She told the Ipswich Star: 'It was waking me up in the night, it was absolutely terrifying. 
'I heard it at all times of the night - 1am, 2am, 4am - it was sporadic, sometimes it would play once, other times it was over and over.'
The 34-year-old decided enough was enough and reported the ghoulish sounding nursery rhyme to the council.
Investigators tracked down the unnerving sound to a nearby industrial estate only a few hundred yards from her home.
The spooky sound was meant to be a deterrent to stop opportunistic thieves and was set off by spiders crawling over the motion sensors.
Alice Connigton, 34, who lives in Ipswich with her two young children, was left haunted by the sinister tune and unable to sleep. She described the noise as 'absolutely terrifying'
Alice Connigton, 34, who lives in Ipswich with her two young children, was left haunted by the sinister tune and unable to sleep. She described the noise as 'absolutely terrifying'
The spooky sound was meant to be a deterrent to stop trespassers and was set off by spiders crawling over the motion sensors
The spooky sound was meant to be a deterrent to stop trespassers and was set off by spiders crawling over the motion sensors
Council investigators tracked down the unnerving sound to a nearby industrial estate only a few hundred yards from Alice Connington's home
Council investigators tracked down the unnerving sound to a nearby industrial estate only a few hundred yards from Alice Connington's home
The spooky song, designed to keep away opportunistic thieves was playing at Farthing Road industrial estate
The spooky song, designed to keep away opportunistic thieves was playing at Farthing Road industrial estate
A spokesman for the council said: 'This is unique in our experience – it was difficult to believe a nursery rhyme would be playing in the middle of the night.
'But we do take all complaints extremely seriously and asked the residents who contacted us to let us know when it was actually playing so we could investigate properly.'We took a call around midnight and immediately went to the area to find out more - we did hear the nursery rhyme playing from an industrial premises and it sounded very eerie at that time of night.
'We appreciate that people living nearby would find it quite spooky.' 
The mother-of-two added she was now looking forward to 'getting some actual sleep.'

Anything the British royals can do! Dutch royals match our monarchy for pomp and ceremony as the King and Queen arrive in a gilded carriage and greet crowds from the balcony during the official opening of parliament

  • Queen Maxima and King Willem-Alexander marked Prinsjesdag - or Prince's Day 
  • Declared the new parliamentary session open amid pomp at The Hague 
  • Dutch Queen looked festive in a colourful pastel gown and striking hat  
  • Royals waved energetically to the crowds from balcony of Noordeinde Palace 
The British monarchy is famed the world over for pageantry such as Trooping The Colour, but it seems the royal family of The Netherlands is equally skilled at putting on an opulent display. 
The third Tuesday in September is a day of pomp and pageantry in the Netherlands, marking the opening of the new parliamentary session, with King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxima leading the festivities. 
The royal couple arrived for Prinsjesdag - or Prince's Day - the festive opening of the new parliamentary year of the States General, which takes place at the Binnenhof in The Hauge in an opulent carriage that wouldn't look out of place in our own Queen's fleet. 
Amid tight security, King and Queen Maxima were driven in an ornate, horse-drawn carriage to parliament from a royal palace in the heart of The Hague, passing through streets lined with cheering crowds. 
The Golden Carriage carriage that is normally used to bring the King and Queen to Prince's Day, passed down from Dutch Queen Wilhelmina, is currently undergoing renovation, although its replacement vehicle looked just as lavish.
Queen Maxima was certainly dressed for the occasion in her pastel blue and green gown, teamed with a striking floral hat and powder blue gloves. 
The Dutch royals were joined on the palace balcony by King Willem Alexander's brother Prince Constantijn of The Netherlands and his wife Princess Laurentien
The Dutch royals were joined on the palace balcony by King Willem Alexander's brother Prince Constantijn of The Netherlands and his wife Princess Laurentien
Queen Maxima alights from the opulent state carriage for the celebration of Prinsjesdag or Budget Day, the festive opening of the new parliamentary year of the States General, which takes place every third Tuesday of September at the Binnenhof
Queen Maxima alights from the opulent state carriage for the celebration of Prinsjesdag or Budget Day, the festive opening of the new parliamentary year of the States General, which takes place every third Tuesday of September at the Binnenhof
As she waited to disembark from the royal carriage and enter the Hague to mark Prinsjesdag, Queen Maxima could be seen smiling broadly and warmly at the camera while waving
As she waited to disembark from the royal carriage and enter the Hague to mark Prinsjesdag, Queen Maxima could be seen smiling broadly and warmly at the camera while waving
King Willem-Alexander of The Netherlands, Queen Maxima  (centre) and their sister-in-law Princess Laurentien of The Netherlands (left) at Palace Noordeine for the annual opening of the Parliamental year in the The Hague
King Willem-Alexander of The Netherlands, Queen Maxima  (centre) and their sister-in-law Princess Laurentien of The Netherlands (left) at Palace Noordeine for the annual opening of the Parliamental year in the The Hague
The royal couple greeted the Senate and the House of Representatives from the throne at the 'Ridderzaal' (Hall of Knights) on 'Prinsjesdag'
The royal couple greeted the Senate and the House of Representatives from the throne at the 'Ridderzaal' (Hall of Knights) on 'Prinsjesdag'
King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima bow to the flag as they arrive in a horse-drawn carriage at the Knight's Hall in The Hague, Netherlands
King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima bow to the flag as they arrive in a horse-drawn carriage at the Knight's Hall in The Hague, Netherlands
The royal couple greeted the Senate and the House of Representatives from the throne at the 'Ridderzaal' or Hall of Knights. 
They were reportedly joined for the event by Maxima's mother, Maria del Carmen, and brother, Juan Zorreguieta. 
King Willem-Alexander traditionally delivers the traditional Speech from the Throne in the Ridderzaal - or Knights' Hall - on Prinsjesdag each year. The occasion was return to more familiar territory for Queen Maxima following a dramatic confrontation with a member of the public during a run-of-the-mill royal engagement last week. 
The Queen was accosted by an angry mother during a visit to the non-profit YETS Foundation in Schiedam, in south Holland.
Dutch Queen Maxima looked festive at the celebration of the Prinsjesdag - Budget Day - in The Hague, which takes place on the third Tuesday in September each year  
Dutch Queen Maxima looked festive at the celebration of the Prinsjesdag - Budget Day - in The Hague, which takes place on the third Tuesday in September each year  
Dutch King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima wave from the balcony of the royal palace Noordeinde in The Hague, Netherlands. The royals seemed in high spirits as they marked the Prinsjesdag - or Budget Day
Dutch King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima wave from the balcony of the royal palace Noordeinde in The Hague, Netherlands. The royals seemed in high spirits as they marked the Prinsjesdag - or Budget Day
Ever the gentleman, King Willem Alexander stood back and let his wife walk down the red carpet after arriving at the Binnenhof in The Hague to give a speech on Prinsjesdag 
Ever the gentleman, King Willem Alexander stood back and let his wife walk down the red carpet after arriving at the Binnenhof in The Hague to give a speech on Prinsjesdag 
Maxima, 47, had just finished speaking to participants in the award-winning youth programme when the woman broke out of the audience and ran towards her.
She wanted to pass a letter to the Queen directly detailing her disabled son's educational and welfare issues, after receiving unsatisfactory responses to previous written appeals to the palace.
'He's been home for eleven months,' she shouted as security guards tried to restrain her from approaching the Queen, telling her they would pass on the letter.
In the end, she managed to approach Queen Maxima who took the note away with her.
The Dutch royals beamed as they waved to the crowds from the palace balcony on the third Tuesday of September - traditionally a day of pomp and pageantry in the Netherlands
The Dutch royals beamed as they waved to the crowds from the palace balcony on the third Tuesday of September - traditionally a day of pomp and pageantry in the Netherlands
King Willem-Alexander looked in particularly high spirits as he took in the attention of the crowd in front of them. And Queen Maxima seemed to clasp her hands together in joy while on the balcony of Noordeinde Royal Palace
King Willem-Alexander looked in particularly high spirits as he took in the attention of the crowd in front of them. And Queen Maxima seemed to clasp her hands together in joy while on the balcony of Noordeinde Royal Palace
The King and Queen of the Netherlands arrived in an opulent carriage that certainly wouldn't look out of place in Queen Elizabeth's fleet 
The King and Queen of the Netherlands arrived in an opulent carriage that certainly wouldn't look out of place in Queen Elizabeth's fleet 
Earlier that same week the royal was joined by Dutch Minister Sigrid Kaag at an event launching the Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion workshop.  
The Dutch queen appeared in excellent spirits as she arrived at the workshop, beaming as she stepped out of her car.  
The appearance marked one of the royal's first since she enjoyed a few weeks off from her duties over summer.
Joining the King and Queen were the King's brother Prince Constantijn of The Netherlands and his wife Princess Laurentien (pictured). The royal family attend the celebration of the Prinsjesdag - Prince's Day - in The Hague today
Joining the King and Queen were the King's brother Prince Constantijn of The Netherlands and his wife Princess Laurentien (pictured). The royal family attend the celebration of the Prinsjesdag - Prince's Day - in The Hague today
As they made their way to the Hague after disembarking from their opulent carriage, Queen Maxima and King Willem Alexander looked to be beset by the wind, which blew their hair back
As they made their way to the Hague after disembarking from their opulent carriage, Queen Maxima and King Willem Alexander looked to be beset by the wind, which blew their hair back
Several people could be seen lining the streets around the Hague, in the Netherlands as the royal family arrived to mark the festive Prinsjesdag (Budget Day)
Several people could be seen lining the streets around the Hague, in the Netherlands as the royal family arrived to mark the festive Prinsjesdag (Budget Day)
Maxima has three daughters, Catharina-Amalia, 14, Alexia, 13 and Ariane, 11, with husband King Willem-Alexander, 51. 
Maxima has endured a difficult few months, recently flying to Buenos Aires for the funeral of her younger sister, Inés Zorreguieta.
Inés took her own life at the age of 33 following a lengthy battle with depression.
Máxima pulled out of several state visits in the wake of Inés death in June, bravely returning to work two weeks later.
Later that month, during a visit to a hospital in Groningen, she appeared to fight back tears as she gave a short speech.
Queen Maxima was beaming as she arrived in her luxurious royal carriage which was flanked by guards in royal livery. Well-wishers could be seen hanging out of windows to get a glimpse of the Queen as she marked Prinsjesdag at the Hague
Queen Maxima was beaming as she arrived in her luxurious royal carriage which was flanked by guards in royal livery. Well-wishers could be seen hanging out of windows to get a glimpse of the Queen as she marked Prinsjesdag at the Hague

SamCam's back at Downing Street! Ex-PM's wife returns to Number 10 alongside Anna Wintour and Edward Enniful as Theresa May holds a London Fashion Week party

  • Sam Cam, 47, is attending Theresa May's Fashion Week Party at Number 10
  • Was joined by designer Christopher Kane as she arrived at the stylish bash
  • Mother-of-three looked chic in a red dress from her own label Cefinn
  • Designers including Alice Temperley also attended the glittering affair  
It was her home for six years until her husband David Cameron's swift resignation in 2016, and tonight Samantha Cameron returned to 10 Downing Street, which no doubt holds some bittersweet memories. 
The designer joined a list of fashion heavyweights including Vogue's Anna Wintour and Edward Enniful for a party thrown by Prime Minister Theresa May to celebrate Fashion Week. 
Sam Cam, 47, as she's affectionately known, beamed as she made her entrance accompanied by designer Christopher Kane. 
The mother-of-three looked chic for the occasion in a red dress from her own label Cefinn, which she set up in 2017 after her husband left office.   
Scottish fashion designer Christopher Kane (left), Samantha Cameron, wife of former British Prime minster David Cameron, and designer Tammy Kane arrive at 10 Downing Street to attend a reception hosted by Theresa May for London Fashion Week
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Scottish fashion designer Christopher Kane (left), Samantha Cameron, wife of former British Prime minster David Cameron, and designer Tammy Kane arrive at 10 Downing Street to attend a reception hosted by Theresa May for London Fashion Week
British editor-in-chief of British Vogue magazine Edward Enninful arrives to a reception hosted by Theresa May in 10 Downing Street in London
British editor-in-chief of British Vogue magazine Edward Enninful arrives to a reception hosted by Theresa May in 10 Downing Street in London
Anna Wintour looked chic in a burgundy leather coat and daring snakeskin boots as she arrived at 10 Downing Street, keeping on her trademark shades as she headed in side to meet the Prime Minister
Anna Wintour looked chic in a burgundy leather coat and daring snakeskin boots as she arrived at 10 Downing Street, keeping on her trademark shades as she headed in side to meet the Prime Minister
US Vogue editor Anna Wintour, 68, nailed her favoured sleek style in a burgundy leather jacket with a floral gown. 
And naturally she kept her trademark shades on, even as she headed inside to meet the Prime Minister. Also representing the Vogue contingent was renowned British journalist Suzi Menkes who is International Editor for the 21 titles around the world.  
The guest list featured British fashion heavyweights including Scottish sibling design duo Christopher and Tammy Kane; Alice Temperley whose designs are a firm favourite with royals such as the Duchess of Cambridge, and photographer Nick Knight. 
Sam Cam looked chic in a red dress from her own range Ceffinn, teamed with cream and black heels as she arrived with sibling design duo Christopher and Tammy Kane
Sam Cam looked chic in a red dress from her own range Ceffinn, teamed with cream and black heels as she arrived with sibling design duo Christopher and Tammy KaneBritish journalist Suzy Menkes, International  Editor for the 21 editions of Vogue around the world, cut a striking figure in shades of purple 
British journalist Suzy Menkes, International  Editor for the 21 editions of Vogue around the world, cut a striking figure in shades of purple 
Legendary US Vogue Editor Anna Wintour was her typical stylish self in a 70s-inspired ensemble, complete with snakeskin boots and her trademark shades 
Legendary US Vogue Editor Anna Wintour was her typical stylish self in a 70s-inspired ensemble, complete with snakeskin boots and her trademark shades 
Sam Cam was all smiles on the steps of her former home, where she last lived just over two years ago. Her husband David Cameron resigned in June 2016 when it emerged that Britain had voted for Brexit. Pictured: Samantha Cameron with Christopher and Tammy Kane
Sam Cam was all smiles on the steps of her former home, where she last lived just over two years ago. Her husband David Cameron resigned in June 2016 when it emerged that Britain had voted for Brexit. Pictured: Samantha Cameron with Christopher and Tammy Kane
Sam Cam, 47, is regularly seen in her own creations and describes her clothes as being for ‘busy women’. 
Last year, President Trump’s wife Melania was pictured wearing a £295 ‘belted muslin shirt dress’ design from the Ceffin range.
Selling online and at top stores including Selfridges and Fenwick, most of Sam Cam’s dresses cost between £270 and £340.
British fashion designer Alice Temperley rocked a culotte-style jumpsuit for the event to celebrate London Fashion Week at Number 10 
British fashion designer Alice Temperley rocked a culotte-style jumpsuit for the event to celebrate London Fashion Week at Number 10 
Stephanie Phair, chair of the British Fashion Council, cut an elegant figure in a black and red floral two-piece teamed with towering heels
Famed British fashion photographer Nick Knight looked dapper in a suit as he attended a fashion reception at 10 Downing Street 
Stephanie Phair, chair of the British Fashion Council, cut an elegant figure in a black and red floral two-piece teamed with towering heels. Famed British fashion photographer Nick Knight looked dapper in a suit as he attended a fashion reception at 10 Downing Street 
In an interview last year the designer admitted: ‘I worry about not selling anything and going bust… it’s definitely terrifying and totally all- consuming – but it’s fun.’
In 2010, the former creative director of Smythson became an ambassador for the British Fashion Council, and was even tipped to become the new chair when Dame Natalie Massenet, the founer of Net-a-Porter stepped down. 
However, the role went to Stephanie Phair, Chief Strategy Officer at the fashion website Farfetch, who was also in attendance at tonight's party. 
Designer Molly Goddard looked striking in a frothy red dress with a voluminous skirt
Sam Cam looked delighted to be heading back to her old home in Downing Street with designer Tammy Kane, two years after she moved out following her husband's resignation
Designer Molly Goddard looked striking in a frothy red dress with a voluminous skirt (left). Sam Cam looked delighted to be heading back to her old home in Downing Street with designer Tammy Kane, two years after she moved out following her husband's resignation 
The wife of the former PM showcased her own label by wearing a £340 brick red maxi dress to the well-heeled bash

British Vogue editor Edward Enninful cut a dapper figure in a dark suit and classic loafersDesigner Molly Goddard looked striking in a frothy red dress with a voluminous skirt (left). Sam Cam looked delighted to be heading back to her old home in Downing Street with designer Tammy Kane, two years after she moved out following her husband's resignation 

British woman, 22, given jail term in Dubai over champagne-fuelled brawl escaped country ahead of sentencing by obtaining new UK passport and jetting home, despite no-fly ban

  • Asa Hutchinson, 22, was with four friends when row with Swedish man broke out
  • During a boozy brunch, they stole his glasses and man was punched on floor
  • Three of the group fled Dubai and were not charged but Ms Hutchinson was
  • Transportation worker escaped the country in June despite no-fly order
  • She was convicted of assault and theft in court Monday can not be jailed
A British woman handed a three-month jail sentence for assaulting a Swedish man in Dubai avoided prison by getting a new passport and illegally flying home, MailOnline can reveal.
Asa Hutchinson, from Chelmsford, Essex, managed to escape house-arrest despite being put on a 'no-fly' list by authorities in the autocratic Gulf state.
The 22-year-old risked everything to return to the UK in June, three months ahead of Monday's court hearing in which she was convicted in absentia over the 2016 brawl.
Ms Hutchinson obtained a new British passport and calmly boarded a plane to London, hoping that border guards would not notice the court order banning her from leaving the UAE.
Sentenced in absentia: British ex-pat Asa Hutchinson, 22, pictured on December 6, 2017 at Dubai Marina
Sentenced in absentia: British ex-pat Asa Hutchinson, 22, pictured on December 6, 2017 at Dubai Marina
Ms Hutchinson's legal team asked the Swedish man to drop his prosecution - but she still faced a charge of assault and theft
Asa Hutchinson, 22
Ms Hutchinson's legal team asked the Swedish man to drop his prosecution - but she still faced a charge of assault and theft
She would have faced further charges if she was caught, MailOnline understands.
Ms Hutchinson now faces immediate arrest if she steps foot in the UAE and extradition if she lands in any of the neighbouring Gulf countries.
'Asa left via the airport [in Dubai] and was fortunate not to have alerted the system [over the 'no-fly' court order],' a source close to Ms Hutchinson told MailOnline.
'She was able to do this because she had replaced her passport. This is not usually possible.
'It was a huge risk and if she returns to the United Arab Emirates she will be arrested.
'Asa also faces extradition if she travels to neighbouring Gulf countries.'
Ms Hutchinson was with two male friends and female friend when a champagne-fuelled row erupted after they took pictures of a sleeping Swedish businessman.  
One of the group woke the man up by slapping him in the face before the women scratched him and stole his glasses and the fight escalated. 
Ms Hutchinson (pictured in Dubai) was convicted without being at court because she is currently home in Chelmsford. It is not yet clear if she will have to return to Dubai to serve her sentence
Ms Hutchinson (pictured in Dubai) was convicted without being at court because she is currently home in Chelmsford. It is not yet clear if she will have to return to Dubai to serve her sentence
Ms Hutchinson, 21, from Brentwood, Essex, right, with her ex-boyfriend, Ben Hall, left, in Dubai, in November 2015
Ms Hutchinson, 21, from Brentwood, Essex, right, with her ex-boyfriend, Ben Hall, left, in Dubai, in November 2015
Ms Hutchinson, who claimed she was only a witness to the fight and the Swedish man threw the first punches, was charged with assault and theft after the incident on April 29, 2016.
She was convicted alongside another man, 26, but the other three members of the group were never charged because they fled Dubai. 
The victim, 54, was struck on the nose and kicked on the floor where he lay helpless and bleeding. A security guard at the restaurant testified that he saw the man being choked on the ground.
After the fight, Dubai police questioned Ms Hutchinson's boyfriend Ben Hall and others in the group after getting their names from the hotel reservations list.The men managed to get their passports back by paying cash deposits, before flying home to the UK.
The Swedish man then made the decision to transfer the charges to Ms Hutchinson after learning she lives in the UAE.
Dubai law dictates that whoever makes the first complaint is the party most likely to be believed, so it may be irrelevant that the Swedish man threw punches.
Taking pictures of someone without their consent and being rude to another person are both classed as Illegal in Dubai and are punishable by jail time.
A Dubai Police lieutenant said that CCTV from the venue - a restaurant in Al Fattan Currency House - showed the Swedish man sleeping as the group approached him.
The Swedish man decided to transfer the charges to Ms Hutchinson (left with her ex-boyfriend) after discovering that she was still living in the UAE
The Swedish man decided to transfer the charges to Ms Hutchinson (left with her ex-boyfriend) after discovering that she was still living in the UAE
A medical report revealed that the victim suffered a broken nose, finger and toe as well as scratches and bruises and was left with a one percent permanent disability as a result of an injury to his left nostril.  
An NGO representing Ms Hutchinson, Detained in Dubai, said she had seen none of the pictures, but did see the boys being hit by the Swedish tech executive.
'The boys managed to flee Dubai before being arrested, and so the Swede laid all the charges on Asa,' a spokesman said.  
'All of the alleged assailants in this incident were released, but because Asa was living in Dubai, and the Swedish man misidentified her as a participant in the row, she was wrongly charged with the assault. 
'Asa has been sentenced in absentia, despite there being no evidence to corroborate the questionable testimony of the alleged victim. 
'We are glad that Asa is safe in the UK, but this judgment demonstrates how easily convictions occur in the UAE in the absence of any acceptable standards of due process.'
It has become an increasingly common occurrence for foreigners to be convicted in absentia in the UAE, particularly when the evidence against them is weak or non-existent; as they are denied the opportunity to defend themselves, Detained in Dubai claims.  
As Ms Hutchinson awaited trial, her father Iain pleaded for complainant Bjorn Roden to 'show some compassion' to his daughter and drop the charges against her.
He said: 'Asa is a young girl in a foreign country, being subjected to a legal system not at all like what we are accustomed to.
Ms Hutchinson in Dubai where she worked
Lucie Harrison, mother of Asa Hutchinson, outside her home in Brentwood
Left: Ms Hutchinson in Dubai where she worked. Right: Lucie Harrison, mother of Asa Hutchinson, outside her home in Brentwood
'We understand how perturbed the complainant in this case, Mr Bjorn Roden, must have felt when the incident occurred, but Asa is innocent, and we ask him to show some compassion for our daughter and drop his complaint before she winds up in jail for something she didn't do'.
He added: 'This older guy was the one hitting everyone, he ought to know better at his age than getting into drunken fights with kids.
'And now he can't throw his weight around and get them into trouble, he is picking on my young daughter.'
Speaking on November 30, Asa said: 'I appeal to the man prosecuting to drop the charges.
'If you feel someone has wronged you, it really wasn't me.
'My friends leaving the country only affects me because this man has now decided to charge me instead.
'I really don't feel like I have done anything to deserve being charged.
'I love my life in Dubai and want to stay here. I have tried to reason with the man because I'm so worried, but it has fallen on deaf ears.
Ms Hutchinson's legal team claimed opening the case against her client was 'morally wrong'. Pictured: Asa (right) with her former boyfriend Ben Hall and his mother, Samantha 
Ms Hutchinson's legal team claimed opening the case against her client was 'morally wrong'. Pictured: Asa (right) with her former boyfriend Ben Hall and his mother, Samantha 
'He only wants to prosecute, and the guys who actually did it are not here, which has left me in the firing line.'
She added: 'Going to prison would be awful. I just couldn't bear it, I really hope it doesn't get that far.
'I want to thank everyone around the world for the messages of support I have been getting.
'I also want to tell my mum and dad, Lucie and Iain that I love them and miss them very much.'
'It is so unfair, I was not involved, I just happened to be there, but the police are not interested in anything I have to say,' she added.
'Once the man made his complaint it was taken as fact. I can't go to jail, I couldn't cope.'   
Ms Hutchinson's mother has previously defended her daughter, saying she is 'absolutely and completely innocent'.
Lucie Harrison, 52, said: 'Asa is absolutely and completely innocent- she was there at the time but all she did was pick some glasses up off the floor and put them in the bin because she was worried someone would step on them.
'What I find really upsetting is that Asa has not turned her back and run away- she was saying, I've done nothing.
'She's really taking the rap, those guys in Dubai really seem to do things by association, I just find the whole thing so shocking.'  
Ms Hutchinson earlier lost her job after the incident and authorities seized her passport. Pictured: Inside Dusty's Bar where Asa and her friends spent the evening before the fight 
It was previously reported Ms Hutchinson was forced to sign confession papers written only in Arabic or be jailed immediately, her lawyers claimed.
Her representatives said she was put under 'extreme pressure' to sign lengthy legal papers written only in Arabic when she was arrested last April.
In a statement previously released, Ms Hutchinson said: 'I was told to sign the papers, or I would be going straight to prison.
'By this stage I was terrified. I had no choice but to sign those papers. I was so scared of prison.' 
Detained in Dubai CEO Radha Stirling said: 'Asa's experience echoes that of countless others. 
'A conspicuously high number of cases in the UAE are concluded as a result of suspects' 'confessions' often in lieu of any other type of evidence collected through investigation.
'Suspects are put under extreme pressure to sign 'confessions' in Arabic.
'We have even seen cases where suspects were forced to sign blank documents upon which the police later wrote their 'confessions'.
'These invalid confessions carry decisive weight in trials, despite the coercion used to obtain them.
'Westerners need to bear in mind that the legal system in the UAE has a long way to go before it is as modern as the skyline'. 
Ms Hutchinson, right, claims that she was nothing more than a bystander to the fight that erupted when the man woke up
Ms Hutchinson, right, claims that she was nothing more than a bystander to the fight that erupted when the man woke up