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Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Conjoined twins attached at the FOREHEAD are set to be separated -despite a risk of one or both dying during the operation

  • Joy and Joyce Magsino, 10, were born with angular frontal partial craniopagus
  • New images show twins in hospital in the Philippines in preparation for surgery 
  • Doctors said a separation is possible but involves a costly, risky operation 
  • The procedure costs £75,000, but the girls' father only earns £6 a day as a porter
  • His wife emigrated in order to work, leaving the girls in the care of their relatives 
  • It is not clear how the family have managed to pay for the cost of the separation 
  • The girls are hard to control as they wish to be separated but are still 'playful' 

  • Conjoined twins attached at the forehead have undergone tests to begin the process of separating them – despite the risk of them dying during the operation.
    Joy and Joyce Magsino, 10, from the Philippines, were born with angular frontal partial craniopagus. 
    Their family are desperate for them to lead normal lives and are prepared to take the risk of losing one or both of them.
    They were told they needed £75,000 to pay for the life-changing surgery but father Patrick Magsino, 30, and mother Jomarie stood no  chance of raising the funds on their own.
    Their parents said at the time of their birth a local charity offered to pay for medical treatment of the girls but they stopped helping in 2014 when medics said the operation could kill them.
    Now, new pictures of the twins have been released showing them in a hospital in San Juan, located east of Manila, as they underwent tests in preparation for the separation procedure.

    Joy and Joyce's family are desperate for them  to be separated from the forehead
    Joy and Joyce's family are desperate for them to be separated from the forehead

    New pictures of the twins have been released showing them preparing for the surgery in hospital in San Juan in the Philippines yesterday
    New pictures of the twins have been released showing them preparing for the surgery in hospital in San Juan in the Philippines yesterday
    It looks like the girls, 10, have passed the time waiting for medical attention by platting their hair together
    It looks like the girls, 10, have passed the time waiting for medical attention by platting their hair together

    Desperation of a poor family
    The family tried desperately to save for the twins' treatment but Patrick's salary is just £6 a day. 
    His wife has even emigrated to work abroad in an effort to get enough money, leaving the girls in the care of their relatives.
    It is not clear how they have managed to pay for the cost of the pricey operation. 
    Back in September, a family spokesperson said: 'The doctors said the operation would be quite risky as one nerve connects the girls and it would have to be connected within seconds or else one of them would die. That is when the foundation withdrew their support.' 

    Doctors said a separation is possible but involves a costly, risky operation 
    Doctors said a separation is possible but involves a costly, risky operation 
    Joy and Joyce were born with angular frontal partial craniopagus which affects around 10 to 20 in every one million births
    Joy and Joyce were born with angular frontal partial craniopagus which affects around 10 to 20 in every one million births
    The girls were photographed getting prepared for the £75,000 surgery
    The girls were photographed getting prepared for the £75,000 surgery
    A medic examines scans of the twins ahead of the risky operation to separate them
    A medic examines scans of the twins ahead of the risky operation to separate them

    'We have been trying hard to organised the funds'
    The twins' father Patrick Magsino, 30, earns just £6 a day as a market assistant porter, while his wife Jomarie emigrated to Qatar to work as a maid in order to save up for the separation procedure. 
    Mr Magsino previously said: 'We have been trying hard to organised the funds for the past five years after the doctors confirmed that the girls can be separated, but we haven't been able to garner even one third of it so far.
    'I am seeking help from hospitals in countries such as the UK, the US and India.
    'I'd be open to any procedure where the safety of both my girls will be ensured.
    'Also, expenses should be covered as well, because on my own I would never be able to afford their treatment.'

    Despite their risk of death in the procedure, the family are keen to go ahead 
    Despite their risk of death in the procedure, the family are keen to go ahead 
    Their father only earns £6 a day, while their mother emigrated in order to work to save money
    Their father only earns £6 a day, while their mother emigrated in order to work to save money
    The family claim a charity offered to help pay for treatment but withdrew when it was 'risky'
    The family claim a charity offered to help pay for treatment but withdrew when it was 'risky'
    Their father says it is hard to control the girls as they want to be separated but are still 'playful'
    Their father says it is hard to control the girls as they want to be separated but are still 'playful'

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