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Friday, 17 November 2017

Headless skeleton of a terrifying 20ft sea monster hunted to extinction in the 18th century reappears on a remote Russian island

  • 20ft (6-metre) long beast died out in the 18th century as they were sitting targets for harpoon hunters
  • An eight hour dig showed that this was a rare find of the existence sea cow once common in the area
  • They found 45 vertebrae, 27 ribs, a left scapula and other bones on the headless creature
  • Sightings of these sea cows were recorded by Arctic explorers before it died out in 1768

  • An ancient sea monster hunted to extinction has reappeared on a remote Russian island.
    The headless remains of a Steller's sea cow were found by nature reserve officials on the far flung Commander Islands in the Bering Sea.
    The 20-foot (six-metre) long beast died out in the 18th century because they were sitting targets for harpoon hunters, having no fear of humans.

    Ribs of the creature were found jutting out of the seashore like a 'fence'.
    An eight hour dig showed that this was a rare find of the existence sea cow, once endemic to the waters of these islands between Russia and Alaska.
    They found 45 vertebrae, 27 ribs, a left scapula and other bones on the headless creature.
    Sightings of these sea cows were recorded by Arctic explorers before it died out.
    Sea cows would have grown up to ten metres (30 feet) long and weighed up to ten tonnes.
    They were good swimmers and spent their days crazing grass on the sea floor using horny pads to chew.
    Nature reserve inspector Maria Shitova spotted the protruding ribs of the skeleton which will be displayed on the islands. 
    The huge animals belonged to a group of mammals known as Sirenia, named after the mermaids of Greek mythology.

































    An ancient sea monster hunted to extinction has reappeared on a remote Russian island. The remains of a Steller's sea cow (pictured) were found by nature reserve officials on the far flung Commander Islands in the Bering Sea


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