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Tuesday, 12 December 2017

EXCLUSIVE: The world's most dangerous beach - Kim Jong-un's soldiers are tossing landmines into the sea aiming for unsuspecting American tourists sunbathing at a South Korean hotspot


  • North Korean soldiers have been throwing landmines into border waters of the the Yellow Sea, which are washing up on Dongmak Beach in South Korea
  • Under the orders of Kim Jong-un, the explosives are aimed at unsuspecting tourists, both American and South Korean, who visit the popular beach resort
  • Officials claim 110 incidents have been reported
  • But unsuspecting American and British tourists have no idea that landmines are being found because they are unable to read the Korean warning signs
  • And as landmines could lurk inches away, unaware beach-goers have been boasting online about their 'relaxing day' at the 'laid-back beach' 


  • Happily walking along the beach, 'carefree' American and British tourists have no idea just what is lying underneath the sand or in the nearby sea.
    Situated just a few miles away from the North Korea border, Dongmak Beach on Ganghwa Island is a popular destination for foreigners and locals wanting to escape the busy capital city of Seoul for the day, which is about 37 miles away.
    On a summer's day, this South Korean coastline is packed with people sunbathing or picking through the sand on the hunt for clams and crabs, some among the 37,500 members of the American military on leave. 
    Yet this isn't any normal beach resort - it's possibly the most dangerous stretch of sand in the world. 
    Despite the restaurants, water slides, quirky attractions and hordes of ocean lovers, Dongmak Beach is in an unenviable position due to its proximity to the North Korean border.
    Kim Jong-un's soldiers have been throwing landmines into the Yellow Sea knowing that strong local currents take them to the waters directly off the popular destination, DailyMailTV has learned.

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    North Korean soldiers have been throwing landmines into border waters of the the Yellow Sea, and the explosives are washing up on Dongmak Beach in South Korea and injuring tourists

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    Officials claim that 110 incidents have so far been reported being found at the beach 


    Dongmak Beach (pictured) on Ganghwa Island is a popular destination for foreigners and locals wanting to escape the busy capital Seoul for the day, which is about 37 miles away


    According to council officials, there's been 110 incidents and many more landmines have been found.
    The problem is much worse in the monsoon season of July and August when the water levels rise and the landmines have the capability to travel further south. 
    Dongmak Beach is situated on the southern tip of Ganghwa Island - which is attached to the South Korean mainland by road - and should be out of harm's way.
    But North Korean soldiers have discovered that the strong currents push the landmines around the island and dump them onto their neighbor's most popular beach, causing maximum havoc.
    Now, South Korean military and police have put up signs warning people how to spot the various shapes and sizes of landmines and to be careful when hunting for crustaceans.
    On one sign, there's a picture of the landmines - one looking like a metal brick and another a small brown disc shape - and the warning reads: 'Watch out for loose landmines from North Korea. 
    'Due to the monsoon and raining season, we have been finding landmines near the beach and it is possible that there are more. If you see any objects that look like the mines in the picture below, do not touch it and please contact military services.'






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