Pages

Monday, 13 August 2018

FBI warns cyber criminals are plotting a mass hack against bank ATMs including HSBC and Barclays 'in days'

The FBI has sent a confidential alert to warn banks of a global 'cash-out scheme'
British banks with large overseas interests have been made aware of the danger
Smaller banks with less sophisticated security are said to be most vulnerable 
America's intelligence chiefs have warned banks of a major hacking threat to cash machines worldwide in the next few days. 
The FBI sent out a confidential alert on Friday to warn that cyber criminals are planning a global 'cash-out scheme' using malware to take over ATMs and steal millions of dollars.  
British banks with large overseas interests including Barclays and HSBC are thought to have been made aware of the danger from the 'jackpotting' technique. 
However smaller banks with less sophisticated security systems are thought to be most vulnerable to an attack, the Daily Telegraph reports.  
The FBI sent out a confidential alert on Friday to warn that cyber criminals are planning a global 'cash-out scheme' using malware to take over ATMs and steal millions of dollars
The FBI sent out a confidential alert on Friday to warn that cyber criminals are planning a global 'cash-out scheme' using malware to take over ATMs and steal millions of dollars
The warning said: 'The FBI has obtained unspecified reporting indicating cyber criminals are planning to conduct a global Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cash-out scheme in the coming days, likely associated with an unknown card issuer breach.'
The website Krebs On Security reported that criminals could create 'fraudulent copies' of bank cards by installing their data on reusable magnetic strip cards.
The FBI warned that 'at a pre-determined time, the co-conspirators withdraw account funds from ATMs using these cards.'
'Historic compromises have included small-to-medium size financial institutions, likely due to less robust implementation of cyber security controls, budgets, or third-party vendor vulnerabilities,' the alert said. 
British banks with large overseas interests including Barclays and HSBC are thought to have been made aware of the danger from the 'jackpotting' technique
British banks with large overseas interests including Barclays and HSBC are thought to have been made aware of the danger from the 'jackpotting' technique
Earlier this year it was revealed that a co-ordinated group of hackers had stolen more than $1million by hijacking cash machines in the U.S. 
The spate of attacks represented the first widespread jackpotting activity in the United States, officials said in January. 
The heists, which involved hacking ATMs to rapidly shoot out torrents of cash, were across the United States spanning from the Gulf Coast to New England. 
An alert at the time from an ATM maker said the method included gaining physical access, replacing the hard drive and using an industrial endoscope to depress an internal button required to reset the device.
A U.S. Secret Service alert sent to banks in January said machines running Windows XP were more vulnerable and encouraged ATM operators to update to Windows 7 to protect against the attack.    

No comments:

Post a Comment