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Wednesday, 5 September 2018

Novichok suspects are Kremlin SPIES: PM reveals two men wanted over Salisbury attack are 'military intelligence officers' - as CCTV shows them smiling 'after smearing poison on victims' front door'

  • Chemical weapons attack on former double agent in Salisbury in March sparked huge police investigation
  • Former Russian spy, his daughter and a police officer were saved but a British mother-of-three died
  • Prosecutors and police have now named two prime suspects, who flew to Russia hours after the attack
  • Police release images of pair grinning on day of attack, along with  images of the perfume bottle they used
  • Theresa May reveals the men being hunted are Russian spies working for GRU military intelligence service
  • But Russia denies any knowledge of the pair - despite them having flown in from and returned to Moscow
Two Russian spies became Britain's most wanted men today after they were named as the prime suspects in the Novichok chemical weapons attack in Salisbury.
Astonishing CCTV images show Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov grinning as they walk around the Wiltshire city on the day former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with the military-grade chemical weapon.
Prime Minister Theresa May today revealed the two men are thought to be officers in Russia's GRU military intelligence service, according to British agencies.
The Novichok attack left a trail of the deadly nerve agent around Salisbury, with mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess dying after she came into contact with the chemical. Mrs Sturgess's partner Charlie Rowley and county police officer Nick Bailey were also hospitalised.
Crystal clear CCTV images released today show the two Russian agents entering Britain at Gatwick, strolling around Salisbury on the day of the attack, and leaving the UK at Heathrow Airport just hours after the Skripals were found collapsed in a park.
Prosecutors will not be applying to Russia for the extradition of the two men, as no agreement exists between the countries, but a European Arrest Warrant has been obtained in case either of the pair are ever spotted outside of Russia.
Alexander Petrov (pictured) and Ruslan Boshirov are the two Russian spies being sought over the Novichok poisoning in Salisbury in MarchAlexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov (pictured) are the two Russian spies being sought over the Novichok poisoning in Salisbury in March
These are the two Russian spies being sought over the Novichok poisoning in Salisbury in March. Police say it is unlikely Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov are their real names, as they are thought to have many aliases
Petrov (right) was seen grinning in Salisbury on the day police believe the men smeared Novichok on Mr Skripal's front door
Petrov (right) was seen grinning in Salisbury on the day police believe the men smeared Novichok on Mr Skripal's front door
The pair were caught on CCTV at Salisbury train station  on March 3, the day before Mr Skripal was poisoned. Scotland Yard believe they came to the town to carry out a reconnaissance mission
The pair were caught on CCTV at Salisbury train station on March 3, the day before Mr Skripal was poisoned. Scotland Yard believe they came to the town to carry out a reconnaissance mission
Police released an image of the perfume bottle believed to have contained the NovichokThe perfume was picked up by Dawn Sturgess, who sprayed it on her wrists, before she collapsed and died
Police released an image of the perfume bottle believed to have contained the Novichok and the box it was hidden in. This was picked up by Salisbury resident Dawn Sturgess weeks after the attack. She sprayed it on her wrists before she died
Theresa May told MPs that British secret services believe the two suspects are officers of the Russian military intelligence agency known as the GRU.
She said it's unlikely the agency would have been allowed to carry out such a brazen attack on its own and the hit was 'almost certainly approved at a senior level of the Russian state'.
Mrs May added: 'The GRU is a highly-disciplined organisation with a well-established chain of command. So this was not a rogue operation.
'The actions of the GRU are a threat to all our allies and all our citizens. On the basis of what we have learnt in the Salisbury investigation and what we know about this organisation more broadly, we must now step up our collective efforts specifically against the GRU.' Mr Skripal was a colonel in the GRU before he was jailed for selling secrets to the West and brought to Britain in a spy swap. The Prime Minister's announcement therefore suggests the hit may have been organised by his former colleagues.
Police said it is likely the suspects, who are aged around 40, were travelling under aliases and Petrov and Boshirov are not their real names. They are appealing to anyone around the world who knows their real identities to contact them.
In a busy morning of announcements and statements, prosecutors revealed Petrov and Boshirov are wanted for conspiracy to murder Mr Skripal and the attempted murder of his daughter. 
If caught, the Russians will also be charged with the attempted murder of DS Bailey and the use of Novichok contrary to the Chemical Weapons Act.
But Russian authorities denied all knowledge of the two men, with foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova telling reporters: 'The names published by the media, like their photographs, mean nothing to us.'

Novichok 'assassins' movements revealed: Spies flew into Britain from Russia before getting train to Salisbury

Scotland Yard today released detailed information about the movements of the prime suspects in the Novichok nerve agent attack.
Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov arrived in the UK on a Friday afternoon in March and checked into a budget hotel in east London.
On the Saturday, the day before the attack, they carried out a reconnaissance trip to Salisbury before returning to London.
On the Sunday, they took another train to Salisbury and are thought to have smeared the Novichok on Mr Skripal's front door. That afternoon they returned to London and flew from Heathrow hours after the Skripals were found collapsed in a park. 
 
Friday, 2 March3pm: The suspects arrive at Gatwick airport, having flown from Moscow on Aeroflot flight SU2588.
CCTV images from 3pm on Friday, March 2 show Petrov (pictured) and Boshirov arriving at Gatwick airport on a flight from MoscowCCTV images from 3pm on Friday, March 2 show Petrov and Boshirov (pictured) arriving at Gatwick airport on a flight from Moscow
CCTV images from 3pm on Friday, March 2 show Petrov (left) and Boshirov (right) arriving at Gatwick airport on a flight from Moscow
Friday, March 2 5.40pm: After travelling into London by train, the pair arrive at Victoria station.
6pm: They travelled to Waterloo station, where they were seen between 6pm and 7pm.
7pm: The pair then travelled to the City Stay Hotel in Bow Road, East London, where they stayed on the night of the Friday, 2 March.
Saturday, 3 March: 11am: They left the hotel and took the underground to Waterloo station, arriving at approximately 11.45am.
The two spies were pictured in Salisbury the day before the attack, when they carried out a reconnaissance trip
The two spies were pictured in Salisbury the day before the attack, when they carried out a reconnaissance trip
2.25pm: Having caught a train to Salisbury from Waterloo, they arrive in the cathedral city, the day before the attack.
4.10pm: After carrying out what police believe was reconnaissance of the Salisbury area, they leave the city and return to London.
8.05pm: They return to their hotel in Bow and stay there for the night.
Sunday, 4 March8am: They made the same journey from the hotel, again using the underground from Bow to Waterloo station before continuing their journey by train to Salisbury. CCTV later showed them in the vicinity of Mr Skripal's house and police believe that they contaminated the front door with Novichok. 
The pair are pictured at Salisbury train station on the morning of the day the Skripals were poisoned
The pair are pictured at Salisbury train station on the morning of the day the Skripals were poisoned
The pair are pictured in Wilton Road, Salisbury shortly before midday on March, 4, the day the Skripals were poisoned with Novichok
The pair are pictured in Wilton Road, Salisbury shortly before midday on March, 4, the day the Skripals were poisoned with Novichok
The pair were then seen on Salisbury's Fisherton Road on March 4 shortly after 1pm, around the time the nerve agent is thought to have been smeared on their target's front door
The pair were then seen on Salisbury's Fisherton Road on March 4 shortly after 1pm, around the time the nerve agent is thought to have been smeared on their target's front door
The pair were seen at Salisbury train station shortly before 2pm on March 4. This is thought to be after they left the Novichok on the door
The pair were seen at Salisbury train station shortly before 2pm on March 4. This is thought to be after they left the Novichok on the door
4.45pm: The arrived at back Waterloo Station after the hour and half journey from Salisbury.
6.30pm: They boarded the London Underground to London Heathrow Airport.
10:30pm: They fly out of London, returning to Moscow on Aeroflot flight SU2585.
The two men were then seen going through security at Heathrow on their way back to Russia at 7.30pm, just hours after the Skripals were found collapsed in the park in Salisbury
The two men were then seen going through security at Heathrow on their way back to Russia at 7.30pm, just hours after the Skripals were found collapsed in the park in Salisbury
Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with the military-grade chemical weapon in Salisbury in March.
Police officer Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey was also poisoned when he attended the retired spy's suburban home. Like the Skripals, he recovered after receiving life-saving treatment at the city's hospital.
But in June, mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess died and her partner Charlie Rowley were hospitalised after they fell ill at his home in nearby Amesbury.
Police have now released an image of the perfume bottle used by the would-be assassins to transport the Novichok. Mrs Sturgess found the bottle and put the substance on her wrists.
Today's announcement relates to the initial attack, but Mr Basu confirmed that officers have now linked the attack on the Skripals to events in Amesbury less than four months later, in which Dawn Sturgess, 44, and her partner Charlie Rowley, 48, were exposed to the same nerve agent. 
Scotland Yard's counter terror Commissioner Neil Basu said: 'Today marks the most significant moment so far in what has been one of the most complex and intensive investigations we have undertaken in Counter Terrorism policing; the charging of two suspects – both Russian nationals - in relation to the attack on Sergei and Yulia Skripal.' 
Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with Novichok in Salisbury in attack which the UK has blamed on RussiaFormer Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictued) were poisoned with Novichok in Salisbury in attack which the UK has blamed on Russia
Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with Novichok in Salisbury in attack which the UK has blamed on Russia
The pair were found collapsed on a park bench in Salisbury in March, sparking a huge investigation which involved anti-terror police, the military and chemical weapons experts
The pair were found collapsed on a park bench in Salisbury in March, sparking a huge investigation which involved anti-terror police, the military and chemical weapons experts
Mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess died and her partner Charlie Rowley fell ill after they came into contact with Novichok. It is thought they found a bottle used to store the chemicalMother-of-three Dawn Sturgess died and her partner Charlie Rowley (pictured) fell ill after they came into contact with Novichok. It is thought they found a bottle used to store the chemical
Mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess died and her partner Charlie Rowley fell ill after they came into contact with Novichok. It is thought they found a bottle used to store the chemical
Mr Basu added: 'We do not believe Dawn and Charlie were deliberately targeted, but became victims as a result of the recklessness in which such a toxic nerve agent was disposed of.
'We know that Novichok was applied to the Skripals' front door in an area that is accessible to the public, which also endangered the lives of members of the public and emergency service responders.'
Britain's most senior police officer, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick added: 'We remain absolutely determined to identify and bring about a prosecution in the UK courts of those persons responsible for these attacks and we will do all we can to get justice for the victims and their families.'
The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) confirmed yesterday the toxic chemical that killed Dawn Sturgess was the same nerve agent as that which poisoned the Skripals three months earlier. 
The OPCW said it was not possible to conclude whether the nerve agent used in the two incidents was from the same batch. 

Why Russia would not extradite suspects

British authorities today said they would not apply to extradite the suspects as any request would be rejected by Putin's regime. 
The Russian constitution forbids the extradition of Russian citizens to another state. 
In 2007, Putin rejected an extradition request for two Russians suspected of the assassination of the former FSB officer Alexander Litvinenko in London using radioactive polonium.
A Whitehall source previously said any extradition request in the Salisbury would be 'Litvinenko all over again'.
Mrs Sturgess's former home in Salisbury was closed off by police in July as her death meant the investigation became a murder probe
Mrs Sturgess's former home in Salisbury was closed off by police in July as her death meant the investigation became a murder probe

It is thought Novichok was smeared on the front door handle of Mr Skripal's Salisbury home
It is thought Novichok was smeared on the front door handle of Mr Skripal's Salisbury home
The Russian state has previously denied involvement. Its embassy in London yesterday demanded access to the Skripals.
A statement released by the Russian Embassy on Tuesday claimed the circumstances of the March attack as 'obscure' and accused British authorities of keeping the Skripals in isolation ever since their release from hospital.
It said: 'They remain out of the public eye at an unknown location, unable to communicate freely with their relatives, friends, journalists or Russian officials, deprived of the freedom of movement.'
 
Police urge guests who stayed at budget London hotel used by 'Russian assassins' to contact them... four months AFTER finding 'low' levels of Novichok toxin in £48-a-night room where the pair spent two days
The Metropolitan Police confirmed today that 'low' levels of Novichok were found in the two-star £48 a night hotel in May during part of their investigations
Guests who stayed at the hotel used by two Salisbury poison suspects are urged to contact police after traces of nerve agent Novichok were discovered in a room.
Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov stayed in the City Stay Hotel in Bow, East London, before carrying out the attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.
The Metropolitan Police confirmed today that 'low' levels of Novichok were found in the two-star £48 a night hotel in May during part of their investigations.
Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu insisted there was no threat to public health, but has asked anyone who stayed there between March 4 and May 4 to contact police.
In a timeline released by police today Petrov and Boshirov travelled to London on March 2 after landing at Gatwick, making their way to the hotel in Bow.
They stayed there for two nights and then went to Salisbury for reconnaissance before returning to the City Stay Hotel for the night.
The next day, the suspects travelled to Salisbury again, which is when they smeared Novichok on the Skripal's door.
Mr Basu said today: 'Two swabs showed contamination of Novichok at levels below that which would cause concern for public health.
'A decision was made to take further samples from the room as a precautionary measure, including in the same areas originally tested, and all results came back negative.
'We believe the first process of taking swabs removed the contamination, so low were the traces of Novichok in the room. Following these tests, experts deemed the room was safe and that it posed no risk to the public
The hotel, on Bow Road in East London, is situated next to a train station. It is where the two Russian suspects stayed during their time in the UK
The hotel, on Bow Road in East London, is situated next to a train station. It is where the two Russian suspects stayed during their time in the UK
He said there has been no reports of anyone falling ill who stayed in the hotel between March 4 and May 4.
Mr Basu added: 'It is likely, given what we have learnt from this investigation, that anyone exposed to Novichock will have experienced symptoms within 12 hours of exposure.
'The levels of Novichok we found in the room at the time of police sampling in May were such that they were not enough to cause short or long-term health effects to anyone exposed to it, at that point or thereafter.
'We will continue to work closely with Public Health England as new information comes to light.
'We are asking anyone who stayed at the hotel between 4 March and 4 May to call 0800 789 321 or email Salisbury2018@met.police.uk. Staff from PHE will be on hand to give advice and reassurance.' 

Revealed: How 'assassins' faked a Nina Ricci perfume bottle full of toxic nerve agent then 'recklessly threw it away', leading to the death of British woman 

A counterfeit bottle of designer perfume picked up by a victim of the Salisbury nerve agent attack contained a 'significant' amount of Novichok.
Charlie Rowley, 48, told police he found a box he thought contained perfume in a charity bin on Wednesday June 27.
The box and bottle were labelled as Premier Jour by Nina Ricci - but Scotland Yard has confirmed that they were counterfeits and had been specially adapted.
Inside the box was a bottle and applicator, and police said Mr Rowley tried to put the two parts together at his home address in Amesbury on Saturday June 30. In doing so, he got some of the contents on himself.
The deadly chemical weapon is thought to have been smuggled around Britain disguised as perfume in this box
The deadly chemical weapon is thought to have been smuggled around Britain disguised as perfume in this box
He said his partner, Dawn Sturgess, 44, had applied some of the substance to her wrists before feeling unwell.
After he told police where he found the box, cordons were put in place and two bins behind shops in Catherine Street, Salisbury, were removed.
Previously, during a search of Mr Rowley's home in Muggleton Road, Amesbury, on July 10, a small box labelled as Nina Ricci Premier Jour was recovered from a rubbish bag in the kitchen.
The Novichok container was designed to look like a bottle of Premier Jour by Nina Ricci. File photo
The Novichok container was designed to look like a bottle of Premier Jour by Nina Ricci. File photo
On July 11, a small glass bottle with a modified nozzle was found on a kitchen worktop.
Tests undertaken at the Government's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory established that the bottle contained a 'significant amount of Novichok', Scotland Yard said.
Ms Sturgess died in hospital in July, just over a week after she and Mr Rowley fell ill.
Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu said the manner in which the bottle and packaging was adapted made it a 'perfect cover' for smuggling the weapon into the country.
He added: 'We have carried out numerous inquiries in relation to the bottle and are now able to release an image of it with the nozzle attached.
'We are also releasing an image of the box that the bottle and nozzle were in.
'We have spoken to Nina Ricci and undertaken further inquiries. Nina Ricci and our inquiries have confirmed that it is not a genuine Nina Ricci perfume bottle, box or nozzle.
'It is in fact a counterfeit box, bottle and nozzle that have been especially adapted.
'I'd like to reassure anyone who has bought Nina Ricci perfume from a legitimate source that they should not be concerned. It is safe.
The GRU headquarters  in Moscow. The agency's operatives were originally seen as rougher and less sophisticated than their KGB counterparts, according to former agents'We cannot account for the whereabouts of the bottle, nozzle or box between the attack on the Skripals on March 4 and when Charlie Rowley said he found it on Wednesday June 27.' 
Who are the GRU and how was double agent Sergei Skripal involved with them? 
The GRU - an acronym for Glavnoye razvedyvatel’noye upravleniye or Main Intelligence Directorate - was founded in 1918 after Lenin's Bolshevik Revolution. 
Lenin insisted on its independence from other secret services and the GRU was seen as a rival by other Soviet secret services, such as the KGB. 
According to Yuri Shvets, a former KGB agent, GRU officers were referred to as 'boots' - tough but unsophisticated.
'The GRU took its officers from the trenches,' he said, whereas KGB picked its agents from the USSR's best universities.
The GRU headquarters  in Moscow. The agency's operatives were originally seen as rougher and less sophisticated than their KGB counterparts, according to former agents
The GRU headquarters in Moscow. The agency's operatives were originally seen as rougher and less sophisticated than their KGB counterparts, according to former agents
The GRU would train agents and then send them to represent the Soviet Union abroad as military attaches in foreign embassies, according to historian John Barron.
But once a member of the GRU, it is believed to be exceptionally difficult to leave. And those who do so to joined foreign agencies were punished savagely.
A younger Sergei Skripal. He went on to unmask dozens of secret agents and feed information to MI6
A younger Sergei Skripal. He went on to unmask dozens of secret agents and feed information to MI6
Viktor Suvorov, a GRU officer who defected to Britain in 1978, said new recruits were shown a video of a traitor from the agency being burned alive in a furnace as a warning.
Unlike the KGB, the GRU was not split up when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991.
It has a special status and answers directly to the chief of the general staff, one of the three people who control Russia's portable nuclear control system.
GRU chiefs are reportedly picked by Putin himself.
The GRU is now considered Russia's largest foreign intelligence service, according to Reuters, dwarfing Moscow's better-known Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR), which is the successor to the KGB's First Chief Directorate.
Sergei Skripal, a former colonel in GRU , was considered by the Kremlin to be one of the most damaging spies of his generation.
He was responsible for unmasking dozens of secret agents threatening Western interests by operating undercover in Europe.
Col Skripal, 66, allegedly received £78,000 in exchange for taking huge risks to pass classified information to MI6.
In 2006, he was sentenced to 13 years in a Russian labour camp after being convicted of passing invaluable Russian secrets to the UK.
A senior source in Moscow said at the time: 'This man is a big hero for MI6.'
The GRU headquarters in Moscow. The agency's operatives were originally seen as rougher and less sophisticated than their KGB counterparts, according to former agents
The GRU would train agents and then send them to represent the Soviet Union abroad as military attaches in foreign embassies, according to historian John Barron.
But once a member of the GRU, it is believed to be exceptionally difficult to leave. And those who do so to joined foreign agencies were punished savagely.Viktor Suvorov, a GRU officer who defected to Britain in 1978, said new recruits were shown a video of a traitor from the agency being burned alive in a furnace as a warning.
Unlike the KGB, the GRU was not split up when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991.
It has a special status and answers directly to the chief of the general staff, one of the three people who control Russia's portable nuclear control system.
GRU chiefs are reportedly picked by Putin himself.
The GRU is now considered Russia's largest foreign intelligence service, according to Reuters, dwarfing Moscow's better-known Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR), which is the successor to the KGB's First Chief Directorate.
Sergei Skripal, a former colonel in GRU , was considered by the Kremlin to be one of the most damaging spies of his generation.
He was responsible for unmasking dozens of secret agents threatening Western interests by operating undercover in Europe.
Col Skripal, 66, allegedly received £78,000 in exchange for taking huge risks to pass classified information to MI6.
After being convicted of 'high treason in the form of espionage' by Moscow's military court, Col Skripal was stripped of his rank, medals and state awards.
He was alleged by Russia's security service, the FSB, to have begun working for the British secret services while serving in the army in the 1990s.
GRU, one of whose divisions has an emblem featuring a bat, was founded after the Russian  Revolution
GRU, one of whose divisions has an emblem featuring a bat, was founded after the Russian  Revolution
He passed information classified as state secrets and was paid for the work by MI6, the FSB claimed.
Col Skripal pleaded guilty at the trial and co-operated with investigators, reports said at the time. He admitted his activities and gave a full account of his spying, which led to a reduced sentence.
In July 2010, he was pardoned by then Russian president Dmitry Medvedev and was one of four spies exchanged for ten Russian agents deported from the US in an historic swap involving red-headed 'femme fatale' Anna Chapman.
After the swap at Vienna airport, Col Skripal was one of two spies who came to Britain and he has kept a low profile for the past eight years.
The former spy was living at an address in Salisbury, Wiltshire, when the suspected poisoning took place in the city centre.

Russia says names of Novichok poisoning suspects 'mean nothing' to them as it continues to deny links to attempted assassination of former spy - despite 'killers' flying in from Moscow 

Russia said Wednesday it did not know the names of two Russians Britain has blamed for a nerve agent attack on a former spy and accused London of manipulating information.
'The names published by the media, like their photographs, mean nothing to us,' foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said.
'We once again call on the British side to switch from public accusations and manipulating information to practical cooperation through law enforcement agencies,' Zakharova said in televised remarks.
Vladimir Putin previously claimed he had never heard of Sergei Skripal before the attack took place
Russia's foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova has said the names of the suspects mean nothing to Russia. Vladimir Putin previously claimed he had never heard of Sergei Skripal before the attack took place
Russia's permanent representative at the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, Alexander Shulgin, called the UK statement a 'provocation'.
'Right from the start we said that Russia has nothing to do with what happened in Salisbury,' Shulgin told Russian state television.
The Russian Foreign Office meanwhile tweeted the clip of the PM jerkily dancing in Africa last week sliced with a video of their press chief Maria Zakharova and her rhythmic moves. 
Mr Putin's foreign policy adviser Yuri Ushakov told reporters in Moscow that the names of the two Russian men suspected in the poisoning 'do not mean anything to me'.
Mr Ushakov pointed to the fact that British authorities mentioned that they think the men's names are aliases, and wondered 'why this has been done and what kind of a message' Britain is trying to send to the Russian government.
The UK's Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said it would not apply for their extradition but it added that it obtained a European arrest warrant for the two men.

A timeline of the key developments in the Salisbury poisoning case

2010 - Sergei Skripal, a former Russian military intelligence officer jailed for spying for Britain, is released and flown to the UK as part of a swap with Russian agents caught in the United States. He settles in Salisbury.
March 3, 2018 - Yulia Skripal arrives at Heathrow Airport from Russia to visit her father in England.
March 4, 9.15am - Sergei Skripal's burgundy BMW is seen in suburban Salisbury, near a cemetery, where his wife and son are commemorated.
March 4, 1.30pm - The BMW is seen driving toward central Salisbury.
March 4, 1.40pm - The BMW is parked at a lot in central Salisbury.
A police officer stands guard outside the Zizzi restaurant where Sergei and Yulia had lunch before they collapsed in a nearby park
A police officer stands guard outside the Zizzi restaurant where Sergei and Yulia had lunch before they collapsed in a nearby park
March 4, afternoon - Sergei and Yulia Skripal visit the Bishops Mill pub.
March 4, 2.20pm to 3.35pm - Sergei and Yulia Skripal have lunch at the Zizzi restaurant.
March 4, 4.15pm - Emergency services are called by a passer-by concerned about a man and a woman in Salisbury city centre.
Officers find the Skripals unconscious on a bench. They are taken to Salisbury District Hospital, where they remain in critical condition.
March 5, morning - Police say two people in Salisbury are being treated for suspected exposure to an unknown substance. 
March 5, afternoon - Wiltshire Police, along with Public Health England, declare a 'major incident'
March 7 - Police announce that the Skripals were likely poisoned with a nerve agent in a targeted murder attempt.
They disclose that a police officer who responded to the incident is in serious condition in a hospital.
March 8 - Home Secretary Amber Rudd describes the use of a nerve agent on UK soil was a 'brazen and reckless act' of attempted murder
March 9 - About 180 troops trained in chemical warfare and decontamination are deployed to Salisbury to help with the police investigation.
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov says Moscow might be willing to assist with the investigation but expresses resentment at suggestions the Kremlin was behind the attack. 
March 11 - Public health officials tell people who visited the Zizzi restaurant or Bishops Mill pub in Salisbury on the day of the attack or the next day to wash their clothes as a precaution.
March 12, morning- Prime Minister Theresa May tells the House of Commons that the Skripals were poisoned with Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. 
March 12, afternoon - Public Health England ask everyone who visited Salisbury town centre on the day of the attack to wash all of their clothes and belongings. 
Officers wearing chemical protection suits secure the forensic tent over the bench where Sergei and Yulia fell ill
Officers wearing chemical protection suits secure the forensic tent over the bench where Sergei and Yulia fell ill
March 14 - The PM announces the expulsion of 23 suspected Russian spies from the country's UK Embassy.  
March 22 - Nick Bailey, the police officer injured in the attack, is released from hospital.  
March 26 - The United States and 22 other countries join Britain in expelling scores of Russian spies from capitals across the globe. 
March 29 - Doctors say Yulia Skripal is 'improving rapidly' in hospital.  
April 3 - The chief of the Porton Down defence laboratory said it could not verify the 'precise source' of the nerve agent.  
April 5, morning - Yulia Skripal's cousin Viktoria says she has received a call from Yulia saying she plans to leave hospital soon.
Dawn Sturgess died in hospital on July 8
Dawn Sturgess died in hospital on July 8
April 5, afternoon - A statement on behalf of Yulia is released by Metropolitan Police, in which she says her strength is 'growing daily' and that 'daddy is fine'.
April 9 - Ms Skripal is released from hospital and moved to a secure location.
May 18 - Sergei Skripal is released from hospital 11 weeks after he was poisoned.
June 30 - Dawn Sturgess and Charlie Rowley fall ill at a property in Amesbury, which is eight miles from Salisbury, and are rushed to hospital.
July 4 - Police declare a major incident after Ms Sturgess and Mr Rowley are exposed to an 'unknown substance', later revealed to be Novichok. 
July 5 - Sajid Javid demands an explanation over the two poisonings as he accuses the Russian state of using Britain as a 'dumping ground for poison'. 
July 8 - Mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess, 44, dies in hospital due to coming into contact with Novichok.
July 10 - Mr Rowley regains consciousness at hospital, and later tells his brother that Dawn had sprayed the Novichok onto her wrists.
July 19 - Police are believed to have identified the perpetrators of the attack.
August 20 -  Charlie Rowley is rushed to hospital as he starts to lose his site, but doctors can't confirm whether it has anything to do with the poisoning.
August 26 - Charlie Rowley admitted to intensive care unit with meningitis 
August 28  - Police call in the 'super recognisers'  in bid to track down the poisoners
September 4 -  Charlie Rowley's brother says he has 'lost all hope' and doesn't have long to live.
Independent investigators, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, confirm the toxic chemical that killed Ms Sturgess was the same nerve agent as that which poisoned the Skripals. 
September 4 -  Charlie Rowley's brother says he has 'lost all hope' and doesn't have long to live.
Independent investigators, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, confirm the toxic chemical that killed Ms Sturgess was the same nerve agent as that which poisoned the Skripals. 
September 5 - Scotland Yard and CPS announce enough evidence to charge Russian nationals Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov for conspiracy to murder over Salisbury nerve agent attack. 

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