Pages

Thursday, 25 October 2018

Women can now serve in ALL roles in the Armed Forces including the SAS, Defence Secretary announces

  • Gavin Williamson has announced that women can now serve in all military roles
  • David Cameron said the ban on close combat roles would be lifted back in 2016
  • Women serving in Army can transfer into infantry roles including Special Forces
All roles in the military are now open to women, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has announced.
The historic day was marked at a land power demonstration on Salisbury Plain, involving some of the first women to join the Royal Armoured Corps.
Mr Williamson announced that, as of today, women already serving in the Army are able to transfer into infantry roles, including the Special Forces.
Those not currently serving will be able to apply for infantry roles in December of this year, with new recruits starting basic training in April 2019.
The Defence Secretary also confirmed that women are now able to apply to join the Royal Marines, with selection starting before the end of this year.
Private Laura Docherty of the Royal Army Medical Corp pictured on patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan
Private Laura Docherty of the Royal Army Medical Corp pictured on patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan
Gavin Williamson today
Royal Army Veterinary Corps Dog Handler Private Beth Johnson, 19, during a Land Combat demonstration at Copehill Down Village on Salisbury Plain today
Gavin Williamson (left) announced that, as of today, women already serving in the Army are able to transfer into infantry roles, including the Special Forces. Pictured right is Royal Army Veterinary Corps Dog Handler Private Beth Johnson, 19, during a Land Combat demonstration at Copehill Down Village on Salisbury Plain todayMr Williamson said: 'Women have led the way with exemplary service in the armed forces for over 100 years, working in a variety of specialist and vital roles.
'So I am delighted that from today, for the first time in its history, our armed forces will be determined by ability alone and not gender.
'Opening all combat roles to women will not only make the armed forces a more modern employer but will ensure we recruit the right person for the right role.'
Training courses will begin at Royal Marines Commando training centre in Lympstone in early 2019. 
While women have for many years given exemplary service, including in combat-facing roles, females were unable to serve in ground close combat roles until the ban was lifted in 2016.

What is the history of women in the British military?

While all frontline roles in the military have only been fully opened up to women today, females have a long history in the country's defence.
Here is a timeline of the role women have played in the UK military: 
Civil wars of 1639 - 51
Many women disguised themselves as men to fight in the Civil war.
The phenomenon was so widespread that King Charles I issued a proclamation banning women from wearing men's military clothing. 
Military nurses in the 19th Century 
Many women helped support Britain's troops by signing up as nurses and caring for the wounded. 
Florence Nightingale revolutionised the profession women to care for soldiers struck down in the Crimean War of 1854 to 1856.
First World War, spring 1917
The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps was founded to carry out support duties in France and Belgium in WW1.
Over 100,000 women had enrolled by the end of the war. 
Second World War
Women originally signed up as cooks, clerks and orderlies to help with the war effort.
They joined the Army and the Royal Airforce (RAF) freeing men up to fight on the frontline.  
1999
Exclusion of women from certain military roles challenged in the European Court of Justice. The challenge is defeated. 
2002
MoD study says women in ground combat roles could adversely affect ‘unit cohesion’
2014
The Women in Close Combat Review paper recommends ending the ban on women in front-line armoured roles
2015
David Cameron announces process to allow women to join all armed forces roles 
October 2018
All roles in the military are now open to women, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has announces 
Tory MP Bob Stewart, 69, a former British Army officer who served in Northern Ireland and rose to become United Nations Commander during the Bosnian war, said the announcement is a 'great idea'.
He said he served with two women on the front line in Northern Ireland - but some of their male comrades were reluctant to let them be 'on point' - when they lead an expedition and take the most exposed position - in case they hit a landmine and were killed.
He said: 'I think it is a great idea - if women can do it, so be it. I had two female soldiers in my company in Northern Ireland in 1982 and 1983 all the time. 
'They went on patrol with us. They looked like us, they were like us. But sometimes the men did not like them to be on point, because they didn't like the idea they might be hurt.'
Asked if he thinks male soldiers today have changed their attitude, he added: 'I think they have largely got over that. But we still have some of that with us. Thank God that we still have some of that in us - that women are special.
'Yes they are equal and can do the job, but many men consider women are on a higher level than men.
'I think women are equal, absolutely 100 per cent, but they have a special place in society.'  
Tory MP Julian Lewis, chairman of the defence select committee, said:  'We must never forget that some of the most courageous fighters in WW2 were the Special Operations Executive women who were dropped into Occupied Europe on the most perilous of missions.
'They undertook this work in full knowledge that they were unprotected by the Geneva Convention and faced torture and execution if captured. 
'Women who volunteer for the Armed Forces and who meet the physical standards required should certainly be allowed to serve.'
Labour MP Ruth Smeeth, who sits on the defence select committee, said it is a 'welcome move but not the end of the journey'. 
She said: 'I think this is a very very welcome action by the Ministry of Defence, although I don't understand why we had to wait so long in order to do it.
'But now it is about making sure this is more than just a change in policy - that we are putting the right support behind it so that everybody can apply for whatever job  they are best suited for.' 
The Royal Armoured Corps was the first ground close combat branch to open its doors in November 2016 to female soldiers and officers, followed by the RAF Regiment in September 2017.
Since November 2016 the Army has about 35 women either serving or being trained to join the Royal Armoured Corps, with a number of personnel already being deployed in their new role to Estonia and Oman.
A Ministry of Defence spokesman said: 'While the military does not necessarily expect large numbers of women to apply for ground close combat roles, the changes are aimed at creating opportunities for individuals from all backgrounds and making the most of their talents.
'By making all branches and trades of the military open to everyone, regardless of their gender, the armed forces are building on their reputation of being a leading equal opportunities employer.'
Royal Army Medical Cops medic Corporal Vicky Helsby (left), 29, from Runcorn, and Private Johnson in Salisbury today
Royal Army Medical Cops medic Corporal Vicky Helsby (left), 29, from Runcorn, and Private Johnson in Salisbury today
Mr Williamson met Kat Dixon of the Royal Armoured Corps, a gun aimer on a Challenger tank crew, during his visit to Wiltshire today 
Mr Williamson met Kat Dixon of the Royal Armoured Corps, a gun aimer on a Challenger tank crew, during his visit to Wiltshire today 
Women Of The Voluntary Ambulance Service Join In A Military Procession in 1939
Women Of The Voluntary Ambulance Service Join In A Military Procession in 1939
Group Of Women Pilots For Ata At Raf Brize Norton (pictured, left to right, Mary Guthrie Veronica Volkerz Monique Agazarian Rita Baines And Joy Gough). Women Of The Air Transport Auxiliary Service. Their Job Was To Fly Combat Aircraft From The Factories To Raf Bases
Group Of Women Pilots For Ata At Raf Brize Norton (pictured, left to right, Mary Guthrie Veronica Volkerz Monique Agazarian Rita Baines And Joy Gough). Women Of The Air Transport Auxiliary Service. Their Job Was To Fly Combat Aircraft From The Factories To Raf Bases
Sir Winston Churchill inspects units of the Civil Defence, here he is inspecting women auxiliary nurses
Sir Winston Churchill inspects units of the Civil Defence, here he is inspecting women auxiliary nurses
Women Of The Air Transport Auxiliary Service (pictured in 1940), they flew combat aircraft rom factories to RAF bases
Women Of The Air Transport Auxiliary Service (pictured in 1940), they flew combat aircraft rom factories to RAF bases

2 comments:

  1. As future wars are likely to be with what we might call the Fuzzy Wuzzy element, I'm sure the Fuzzies will be well pleased. And lets not forget the propaganda potential that will be offered when one of these dear ladies falls into the hands of our no doubt technologically challenged opponents.

    Williamson is clearly an idiot of the first magnitude, and is likely motivated more by recruitment problems than by any deeply held belief in the equality of the sexes.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Government needs more cannon fodder?

    ReplyDelete