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Saturday, 11 January 2020

39 Photos That Show The Danger Of Constructing The Empire State Building

Built between 1930 and 1931, during the Great Depression, the Empire State Building became known as “the Most Famous Skyscraper in the World.” With 3,000 workers, the gigantic buildingwas completed in record time – one year and 45 days. These incredible photos below show the dangers workers face everyday while constructing the iconic Empire State Building.
Carl Russell waving to his co-workers on the structural work of the 88th floor of the Empire State Building. Sep, 13. 1930.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
Steel workers working on the steel frame for the Empire State Building. Sept. 29, 1930.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
An photographic trick placed this steelworker's finger on the pinnacle of the Chrysler Building. This shot was taken from the Empire State Building rising on the site of the old Waldorf-Astoria, New York City. Sept. 29, 1930.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
A construction worker riding on an industrial crane during the construction of the Empire State Building. Oct. 29, 1930.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
A day's work for these smiling window washers as they go about their work cleaning up the Empire State Building at dizzying heights of hundreds of feet above the street. Jan. 26, 1932.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
This shot was taken by the photographer looking down upon the window washers on the 34th street side of the building. Jan. 26, 1932.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
This striking silhouette was taken atop the RCA Building in Rockefeller Center, New York, as workers light their cigarettes at the end of a working day. The Empire State Building rises dramatically in the background. Dec. 2, 1932.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
A picture of one of the bold window washers, as he pauses in his task to draw a lung-full of clean air. Mar. 24, 1936.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
Workmen at the new Empire State building raised a flag on the 88th floor 1,048 feet above the street. The flag is at the highest point in the city, higher than the Crystler Building. Sept. 19, 1930.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
A zeppelin mooring mast will cap this engineering feat. Sept. 29, 1930.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
A B-25 crashed between the 78th and 79th stories, but two days after the tragic after, the building opened to the public on July 30, 1945. Here, workmen erect scaffolding as reconstruction work on the skyscraper begins.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
Workmen placing one of the four far-reaching night beacon lights in position on the 90th floor of the building. Combined, the four beacons will generate almost two billion candle power of light and will be the brightest continuous source of man-made light in the world. Cost of the installation: $250,000. Feb. 28, 1956.
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Bettmann/Corbis, via Mashable/ Retronaut
Here are some more photos:
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library
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Lewis W. Hine/New York Public Library

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