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Thursday, 16 April 2020

Some coronavirus stimulus checks were sent to the wrong accounts

In this April 13, 2014 file photo, the Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington.
In this April 13, 2014 file photo, the Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington.(J. David Ake/AP)

Millions of Americans received their coronavirus stimulus checks via direct deposit on Wednesday, but many have found out that the process wasn’t as smooth as believed when their checks were sent to the wrong accounts.
The IRS launched a web portal to track payments funded by the $2.2 trillion CARES Act. However, on top of glitches with the app, many users reported the money being disbursed but to an account they were not the owner of.
“I was so confused,” Aimme Saldana, a 23-year-old California warehouse worker told USA Today. “I don’t know where they got that number from. I lost two weeks of pay because I was sick. I was depending on that for my car payment.”
Users who ran into this problem were told to check with their bank.
Thomas Krapin, 25, of New York City, “freaked out” when he realized what had happened.
“Once I pressed submit, the account number that they listed didn’t match any of mine. I called my bank and there was nothing they could do. There was no connection to my account,” Krapin told USA Today.
An IRS spokeswoman told USA Today that banks should be returning the payments if the account numbers don’t line up with the name of the intended recipient.
"The payment isn’t going to bounce back and just sit here,'' IRS spokeswoman Jodie Reynolds said. "We will turn around and cut them a paper check and make sure they get their money.''
Reynolds encouraged people who have not received a payment to double-check their account information with the IRS online and update it if their check hasn’t been sent out yet.

2 comments:

  1. And the IRS think the BANK will return the money? In your dreams....in your dreams....

    ReplyDelete
  2. Same thing here. Uncle Scam doesn't even know who I am. Which could be a good thing.

    ReplyDelete