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Tuesday, 28 July 2020

Kim Jong Un says there will be 'no war in our land again' thanks to his nuclear weapons as his country celebrates 67th anniversary of the end of the Korean War

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un told veterans there would not be another war
  • He spoke to celebrate the 67th anniversary of the end of the 1950-3 Korean war
  • Mr Kim said the country's nuclear weapons were a 'reliable, effective' deterrent 
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has said his country's nuclear weapons give it 'an absolute might' against foreign powers.
During a speech to celebrate the 67th anniversary of the end of the 1950-53 Korean War on Monday Mr Kim told war veterans gathered in Pyongyang there would be 'no war in our land again'.
He said the country's nuclear weapons were a 'reliable, effective' deterrent and it was now 'a nuclear state', according to the Korean Central News Agency.
'Now, we've changed to a country which can defend itself reliably and unwaveringly against high-intensity pressures and military threats and blackmailing by imperialistic reactionaries and hostile forces,' he said.
During a speech to celebrate the 67th anniversary of the end of the 1950-53 Korean War in Pyongyang on Monday Mr Kim told war veterans there would be 'no war in our land again'
During a speech to celebrate the 67th anniversary of the end of the 1950-53 Korean War in Pyongyang on Monday Mr Kim told war veterans there would be 'no war in our land again'
The 6th National Conference of War Veterans at the April 25 House of Culture in Pyongyang cheered as Mr Kim spoke on Monday
The 6th National Conference of War Veterans at the April 25 House of Culture in Pyongyang cheered as Mr Kim spoke on Monday 
'There won't be any war on this land again and our national security and future will be guaranteed firmly and permanently because of our reliable, effective self-defensive nuclear deterrent.'
His speech followed recent remarks by both North Korean and US officials suggesting they were reluctant to engage in a new round of diplomacy on the North's nuclear program.
Mr Kim, 36, and President Donald Trump met three times since 2018 - when Mr Kim abruptly reached out to Washington and Seoul for talks.
He said he wanted to deal away his advancing nuclear arsenals. 
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said President Trump would only want to engage with Mr Kim again if there were real prospects of progress.
Fireworks were set off in Pyongyang to celebrate the anniversary of the end of the Korean War
Fireworks were set off in Pyongyang to celebrate the anniversary of the end of the Korean War
Mr Kim gave Paektusan commemorative pistols to leading commanding officers of DPRK armed forces on the 67th anniversary of the Korean War ceasefire
Mr Kim gave Paektusan commemorative pistols to leading commanding officers of DPRK armed forces on the 67th anniversary of the Korean War ceasefire
During the celebrations Mr Kim gave out commemorative pistols to army officers. They held the pistols against their chests and made firm pledges to fight for their leader
During the celebrations Mr Kim gave out commemorative pistols to army officers. They held the pistols against their chests and made firm pledges to fight for their leader
Mr Kim's sister and senior ruling party official, Kim Yo Jong, said a new summit would be 'impractical' for North Korea and that Pyongyang would not gift Mr Trump a high-level meeting that he can boast as a foreign policy achievement. 
Many experts were sceptical of Mr Kim's disarmament commitment and said he only aimed to weaken US-led sanctions and perfect his nuclear program.
The nuclear diplomacy remains largely stalled since a second meeting in February 2019 in Vietnam collapsed without reaching any agreement because Mr Trump rejected Mr Kim's proposal to get extensive sanctions relief in return for a limited denuclearisation step.
Veterans raised their hands as they clapped for their leader in the capital of North Korea during a ceremony on Monday
Veterans raised their hands as they clapped for their leader in the capital of North Korea during a ceremony on Monday
Mr Kim said the country's nuclear weapons were a 'reliable, effective' deterrent and it was now 'a nuclear state', according to the Korean Central News Agency
Mr Kim said the country's nuclear weapons were a 'reliable, effective' deterrent and it was now 'a nuclear state', according to the Korean Central News Agency
His speech followed recent remarks by both North Korean and US officials suggesting they were reluctant to engage in a new round of diplomacy. Pictured, Mr Kim with his army officers
His speech followed recent remarks by both North Korean and US officials suggesting they were reluctant to engage in a new round of diplomacy. Pictured, Mr Kim with his army officers
Mr Kim entered this year with a vow to bolster his nuclear program and threatened to unveil a new 'strategic' weapon.
He also said he would no longer be bound by a self-imposed temporary pause on nuclear and long-range missile tests.
Mr Kim has not performed such high-profile weapons tests, which some analysts say could completely derail diplomacy with the US.
During the celebrations Mr Kim gave out commemorative pistols to army officers. 
They held the pistols against their chests and made firm pledges to fight for their leader at the cost of their lives.
In this hand-out photo from North Korea's state news agency KCNA, leader Kim Jong Un reportedly holds an emergency enlarged meeting of politburo

It comes after Mr Kim convened an emergency politburo meeting after a person suspected of having COVID-19 illegally crossed the border from South Korea into the state earlier this month, state media said on Sunday.
If confirmed, it would be the first case officially acknowledged by North Korean authorities, who have so far said the country has no confirmed cases of the disease.
Kim declared a state of emergency and imposed a lockdown on the border city of Kaesong, calling it a 'critical situation in which the vicious virus could be said to have entered the country,' state news agency KCNA reported.

North Korean women were regularly tortured, beaten and raped in detention centres after trying to flee the country, UN report reveals 

North Korean women imprisoned in camps suffered from torture, rape and 'multiple and serious' violence at the hands of officials, a UN human rights report has claimed.
More than 100 women detained between 2009 and 2019 after failing to flee the country spoke to UN investigators in Seoul after their release.
They said they were deprived of food, sleep, daylight and fresh air.
In a report titled I Still Feel The Pain many said they were subjected to torture, invasive body searches, forced abortions and even rape.
All of the women eventually managed to defect to South Korea. 
More than 100 women detained between 2009 and 2019 after failing to flee the country told UN investigators in Seoul they were deprived of food, sleep, daylight and fresh air. Pictured, two women wearing face masks in Pyongyang
More than 100 women detained between 2009 and 2019 after failing to flee the country told UN investigators in Seoul they were deprived of food, sleep, daylight and fresh air. Pictured, two women wearing face masks in Pyongyang
'I did not sleep and worked because I did not want to be beaten. It was excruciating to a level that I even attempted to commit suicide,' one woman said.
North Korea did not immediately react to the report but it has previously called criticism over its human rights record a 'plot to overthrow' its regime.
Another woman recalled one of her first nights in detention in 2010 when she was raped by an officer.
'He threatened that ... I would be humiliated if I rejected him. He even told me he could help me to be released sooner if I did as he said,' she said.
North Korea did not immediately react to the report but it has previously called criticism over its human rights record a 'plot to overthrow' its regime. Pictured, people wearing masks in Pyongyang on July 3
North Korea did not immediately react to the report but it has previously called criticism over its human rights record a 'plot to overthrow' its regime. Pictured, people wearing masks in Pyongyang on July 3
Gathering information in isolated North Korea is notoriously difficult, and the report acknowledged the lack of access to the country limited the agency's ability to verify the interviewees' accounts.
Daniel Collinge, a U.N. human rights officer who co-authored the report, said the project was aimed at putting pressure on Pyongyang to improve the situation, while urging other countries not to deport defectors who risk their lives to achieve freedom and prosperity.
South Korea's Moon Jae-in government, which is trying to improve ties with the North, recently came under criticism after revoking the licenses of defector groups and banning their campaigns to send anti-Pyongyang propaganda leaflets across the border.  


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