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Tuesday, 18 August 2020

Baby orang-utans are ferried to 'nursery' by wheelbarrow in adorable footage shared by ape orphanage

  • Baby orang-utans at an Indonesian nursery are taken to nursery in wheelbarrows
  • Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation use red carts to transport the baby apes
  • Adorable footage shows the orang-utans relaxing as they are ferried to nursery
  • The apes attend a nursery at the orphanage to socialise with other orang-utans 
An orang-utan orphanage has started transporting its baby apes to 'nursery' using a wheelbarrow after realising the adorable animals could not keep up during the morning commute.
Young orang-utans at Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation in Kalimantan, Indonesia, join a nursery group where they can meet other apes, while the older apes attend 'forest school'.
The orphanage came up with an inventive way to take the orang-utans to school after realising their legs could not keep up to speed during the commute.
Now the baby apes are ferried off to nursery in wheelbarrows, which each hold around four young orang-utans.
The orphanage shared adorable footage of their taxi service, showing the orang-utans relaxing ahead of their day of learning.
Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation in Kalimantan, Indonesia, started ferrying their baby orang-utans to nursery in wheelbarrows after realising they could not keep up during the walk
 Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation in Kalimantan, Indonesia, started ferrying their baby orang-utans to nursery in wheelbarrows after realising they could not keep up during the walk
The orphanage shared adorable footage of their taxi service, showing the young orang-utans relaxing as they are taken to nursery in style
The orphanage shared adorable footage of their taxi service, showing the young orang-utans relaxing as they are taken to nursery in style
In the footage, around four apes sit in each red cart as the workers push them to nursery, where they are taught how to locate food in the jungle and build a nest to sleep in
 In the footage, around four apes sit in each red cart as the workers push them to nursery, where they are taught how to locate food in the jungle and build a nest to sleep in
In the video, the baby apes are helped to climb into the red carts by the workers and when they are safely inside, they are ferried off to nursery.
The loveable animals sit and peer over the side of the wheelbarrows to look at their surroundings as they enjoy their luxury treatment.
During nursery, the orang-utans are taught how to locate and open all the varied foods found in the jungle and how to build a secure nest to sleep in.
Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation is an Indonesian charity which rescue, rehabilitate and reintroduce orang-utans back into their natural habitat.
Many of which are orphans who have been separated from their families due to mass deforestation, forest fires, poaching and the illegal pet trade. 
The baby apes join a nursery where they are able to socialise with other orang-utans, while the older animals attend a 'forest school'
 The baby apes join a nursery where they are able to socialise with other orang-utans, while the older animals attend a 'forest school'
Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation is an Indonesian charity which rescue, rehabilitate and reintroduce orang-utans back into their natural habitat
 Borneo Orang-utan Survival Foundation is an Indonesian charity which rescue, rehabilitate and reintroduce orang-utans back into their natural habitat
Many of the young orang-utans are orphans, who were separated from their families due to mass deforestation and poaching
Many of the young orang-utans are orphans, who were separated from their families due to mass deforestation and poaching
Nyaru Menteng Orang-utan Rehabilitation Centre and the Samboja Lestari Orang-utan Rehabilitation Centre in Kalimantan, Indonesia, have a veterinary team who assess the apes upon arrival.
Once the surrogate mothers have found the juvenile orang-utans to be skilled, they are moved to socialisation complexes.
They are then temporarily housed in groups in large cages where they can practise their socialisation skills with new individuals.
While orang-utans are classed as semi-solitary animals, in the wild they interact with other members of their species when mating, during times of high food availability, and when disputing territories.

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